CX In the Swamp – New Location!

New CX Meet-Up Location

New meet up location and new course. Just off the intersection of Harrison and Wisner.

We’ll be out there again this Thursday at 6pm. Loose agenda: practice some technical aspects, parade lap around the course to show obstacles/dangers, a few times at easy pace and then a four lap race for bragging rights.

Bring:
Bike suitable for offroad riding. A CX bike is best, but a MTB will work. Fat tires on a road bike would even cut it for this grassy riding.

Water – It’s really hot out there. There will be cold beer provided for the express purpose of fueling friendly competition. Be sure to bring a couple bidons of cold H2O, though, or you might not last to beer’o’clock.

Helmet – Duh.

Bug Spray – We’ll be standing in tall grass, in Louisiana, in the dead of summer. You’ve been warned.

CX Skills – Bring any experience you have riding CX or off-road in general. This can range from absolutely none all the way to pretty much everything. Although those with more experience should be prepared to open their mouths, and those with less to open their ears.

We are going to get rad on the old golf course. Come mash in the grass with us and put away a couple cold ones.

Cheers,
Yeah You Ride

CX In the Swamp

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We’ll be out there again this Thursday at 6pm. Our ‘cross guru won’t be out with us, but we’ll run things in a similar format as last time: practice some technical aspects, ride the course a few times at easy pace and then a four lap race for bragging rights.

Bring:
Bike suitable for offroad riding. A CX bike is best, but a MTB will work. Fat tires on a road bike would even cut it for this grassy riding.

Water – It’s really hot out there. There will be cold beer provided for the express purpose of fueling friendly competition. Be sure to bring a couple bidons of cold H2O, though, or you might not last to beer’o’clock.

Helmet – Duh.

Bug Spray – We’ll be standing in tall grass, in Louisiana, in the dead of summer. You’ve been warned.

CX Skills – Bring any experience you have riding CX or off-road in general. This can range from absolutely none all the way to pretty much everything. Although those with more experience should be prepared to open their mouths, and those with less to open their ears.

We are going to get rad on the old golf course. Come mash in the grass with us and put away a couple cold ones.

Cheers,
Yeah You Ride

Where we’ll be. West of Pan-Am, head into the park towards the lake off Zach Taylor.

CX Location

Rapha Women’s 100K

Yeah You Ride wasn’t able to make it the local version of Rapha Women’s 100K, but lucky for us (and you!), our good friend Katie Hunter-Lowrey agreed to guest blog for us. Thanks, Katie!  Enjoy!

Thanks to Rob Sudan (@robsudan), @roulernola and @semitoughcycling for the photos. 

I had been excited about this event for weeks, nay, MONTHS and Sunday’s Women’s 100K did not disappoint. It was an international event by Rapha to bring women together in cycling and honor an amateur stage of “Le Tour.” Rouler put on the New Orleans ride with a route bringing us from coffee shop to swamp and through three parishes. My only previous experience with this long of a distance was while on a bike tour, so I was a bit nervous the night before. Morning of, dying of cramps and chugging caffeine (it wouldn’t be a women’s event if I wasn’t talking about my period/diva cup) I met a fellow downtowner at 6 am and we headed to Manhattanjack’s together. After lots of weather radar analysis, 13 women-identified riders were on the road. A couple Semi-Tough dudes were taking photos and providing support, though despite my request I was given no slow claps or bacon.

The morning totally flew by. We all chatted, shared bananas and got to know one another. For some women it was their biggest ride yet and for others it was clearly no problem to lead us at 20 mph for a good stretch. After one flat very early on, we hit the lakefront, headed down towards the Ninth Ward, into St. Bernard Parish and then took the ferry across to the West Bank. From there we went through Algiers and then out to Jean Lafitte State Park. Being in a pace line along the levee trail and then mashing through swampland was the highlight for me. As a person who has biked fast during their commutes for a long time, I’ve only recently come to love being in packs and it’s been a struggle to find groups of women and queers to shred with. To have 100 whole K’s of road with ladies who were all there to bike hard and have fun was incredibly empowering.

Coming back towards our second ferry crossing the hunger and heat were starting to set in but we made it to Jackson Square still in high spirits. After a final photo-op we went our separate ways to eat all the food and drink all the beers. Mega high-five’s to Wes, Townsend, Rouler and the Semi-Tough Cycling Club for putting the ride together and all the riders for a really positive experience. I could have biked 66 more miles later that day just on the high of it all.

My hope is that events like this become the norm around town and that more women can be involved in the planning of them. I very much appreciate the effort put into organizing the day, but did still feel like it was being led by men. Things I’m sure were meant to be helpful came off as commands on safety and were suggestions that I’ve never seen made in group rides that are majority male. None of us were there because it was our first time on a bike. Hopefully this criticism can be taken as a call to collaborate. Emerging organizations such as NOLA Women on Bikes or the Loose Bloomers training rides are great places for cis-male cyclists to act as allies and learn what kind of support we would prefer. Everyone will get further faster by working together and I KNOW we all want to go faster.

-KDHL

2 Broke 4 The Worlds – New Orleans Messenger Summit

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One time, we were messengers. The pay was bad. After adjusting for on-shift burrito consumption, average net was ~$0 USD. Working with that kind of budget, it’s easy to rule out international travel. So for all the messenger community that can’t scrape together a measly $500,000 to go to Switzerland, pack up your bike and take a vacation/bender in New Orleans, August 2-4, the coldest week of the year.

Continue reading “2 Broke 4 The Worlds – New Orleans Messenger Summit”

Cyclocross Practice

There Will Be Mud…

CX is coming, like, for real. As the wet blanket that is NOLA summer is tucked in tightly around us, it’s not just a great escape, but a good idea to start dreaming about your favorite fall cycling activity. Skip Town put together a little skillshare/practice session yesterday at City Park using some of the path that was mowed for the recent duathalon. After giving a few pointers on some CX basics like dismounting/remounting, barrier hopping and shouldering, a few wet and muddy (YES!) laps of the course were taken by all. Because why not, a four lap “race” for cold PBRs was declared. After much rotation of position and a fantastic wipeout into the reeds by Chris Snider, the gold was brought home by #localhardman Rich. Like finding the baby in the King Cake, he gets to bring beer to the next practice.

If anyone is interested in learning about cyclocross, riding your bike in the weeds or just talking bikes, you should come out. We had CX bikes and MTB, so all are welcome. While we will be taking next Thursday off to drink lots of French wine and watch le Tour at Fauborg Wines (Join us for the Tour du Vin!) we’re hoping this will become a weekly Thursday ride. If you’ve never ridden CX before, don’t sweat; neither have we. The ride can be as intense or relaxed as you want, with plenty of cold beer and camaraderie. More info on the next one will be posted here and all over the Facebook land.

Get Spinnin’

-Boedi

Cyclocross Skillshare in City Park

Cyclocross Practice

The rumors are true. Cyclocross racing is coming to Louisiana, and we’re getting a leg up on training. Our good friend Skip is working hard to organize CX practice rides on the duathalon course in City Park. They are slated to be EVERY THURSDAY, 6PM AT PAN-AM STADIUM IN CITY PARK. We will start out covering basics like dismounts and remounts, carrying, clearing barriers, and basic off-road riding.

Bring:
Bike suitable for offroad riding. A CX bike is best, but a MTB will work. Fat tires on a road bike would even cut it for this grassy riding.

Water – It’s really hot out there. There will be cold beer provided for the express purpose of fueling friendly competition. Be sure to bring a couple bidons of cold H2O, though, or you might not last to beer’o’clock.

Helmet – Duh.

CX Skills – Bring any experience you have riding CX or off-road in general. This can range from absolutely none all the way to pretty much everything. Although those with more experience should be prepared to open their mouths, and those with less to open their ears.

We are going to get rad on the old golf course. Come mash in the grass with us and put away a couple cold ones.

Cheers,
Yeah You Ride

More Parisite Alleycat Pics

Huge thanks to readers that are sending in pics, stories, and info from the alleycat. We love hearing from y’all and we love free content! Here’s some sweet snaps manifest info we got sent. Keep em coming!

Parisite Alleycat Checkpoints:
Parasite
Super Dome
Humidity Skate Shop
Downtown Tattoos and Piercing
NAVY base in Bywater
Siberia
Parasite

Stay dry out there,
Yeah You Ride

 

 

 

Race Recap: Independence Day Classic

The thunder woke me around 7. Rain pelted the windows. No light came from around the curtains. In the bathroom, water dripped from a crack in the ceiling into the sink, a metronome counting out no particular time. “Shit.” I thought, “What a lovely day for bicycle racing.”

My phone lit the room like a slow bolt of lightining. A message from Robinson. “13 registered riders in the road race!” I replied, predicting the actual turnout would be exactly 0, citing the incipient fall of the sky itself as the primary cause. Boedi and Rob assured me this was nonsense and that the weather would change. So under great encouragement (which felt at the time more like great duress) from my teammates, I got my gear together and waited for Boedi to give me a lift to Rob’s place.

Now, Rob is from Texas, which means he eats Mexican food for breakfast. So, after chowing down on eggs, rice and quinoa on tortillas with lots of Cholula, my new favorite pre-ride meal, Rob handed me a mason jar of what looked like fresh goat blood. Disappointingly, it turned out to be beet juice. It did make me feel better, though, and I stopped being such a pessimistic twatwaffle. Resigned to our destiny, we waded out to the car and drove to Houma, precipitation persisting the entire way.

We met up with Stu at the Mariott and found the registration booth, which happened to be the front seat of an SUV and by this time the rain had died off. We had also received word the road race was cancelled due to massive disorganization, lack of police support, and poor course marking. The Cat 1,2,3 riders had set out, apparently taken a wrong turn, found themselves with lack of protection, off course, and had to be called back. So there would be no road race for the Cat 4,5 riders either. There would however be a criterium and a time trial, so all was not lost. At least it was not raining. At least we would ride. At least, back at home, the ceiling was just leaking into the sink.

Rob and I threw on our kits; matching Roulandrian Flag jerseys from Rouler and mismatched shorts. We got our bikes assembled and set out to warm up before the crit. We rode 50 meters along the parking lot, turned the corner of the hotel, and found all of the Cat 4,5 riders massed underneath an awning, next to finish line equipment and a race clock. The crit was about to begin. Stone cold, Rob and I took places at the back of the pack, and waited 4 seconds for the race to begin.

The crit went down like this:
Bang, zoom, straight to the corner. 20 minutes plus 10 laps. The course was a big square, with the last turn a bit tighter than the rest (ignore the geometric impossibility of that idea).
Start: From jump there was a breakaway. Rob worked with the lead pack to pull it back. The speed of the first 10 minutes felt like the highest of the whole race, as a result of chasing the break and driving home the message that nobody was going off the front solo.
Lap 3: 
I fell off the back early on, and fought to close a 10 meter gap from the lead pack for about 10 laps. I felt like a dweeb chasing after the pack and with such a gap, a tag-along turd. “Wait for me guys!”
Lap 20ish: 
Behind me, riders were getting pulled out the race as they were lapped. Ahead of me the speed of the pack began to flag a bit when it became apparent a breakaway was futile, and riders began to wait each other out. Robinson had made his way back towards the front. I was able to catch up to him and together we made our way into top positions.
6 Laps to Finish: Rob had been pulling for a while, and seemed to be getting tired. I pushed around him to take the pull before he could come unglued and let a wheelsucker slip by. For the remainder of the race he and I held the front.
Finish: Rob asks me at the very beginning “How are you doing?” “Huffing and puffing,” came my reply. Rob heard “I’m pumping.” Despite a complete communication breakdown it was tacitly agreed that changing positions was too risky and I would have to hammer it out in front until the final attack. It came just before the final turn, with Boyd, Robinson, and Breaux sprinting around me. I jumped to sprint after them. Rob and I both came into the final turn white hot, and had to feather the brakes to avoid slapping the curb. Fortunately the riders behind him were able to predict and ride the turn out safely. Unfortunately, behind me, Stanton came in too hot, maybe trying to pass in the final turn, and hit the wall behind me.
Results: Robinson Sudan takes 1st Place, Richard Carman takes 4th in the criterium. Our team wins. More detail available here.

Stu took us back to his place where we ate veggie sandwiches, drank more goat blood, and watched Le Tour on DVR. Stu confirmed my suspicion that he was a man of fine taste when he offered us La Croix in a bottle. I didn’t even know they came like that. Shortly later we headed out to the time trial.

What can really be said for a time trial?
It was muggy. Headwind out, much less tailwind back than one would have expected. Straight shot, 3.5 miles down the bayou, sharp 2 lane turnaround (literally turning around an orange traffic cone), and the same 3-and-a-half back. For some reason the finish was 200 meters before the start, which snuck up and killed my chance to sprint the finish. All in all, fairly uneventful.
Results: Robinson Sudan takes 2nd, Richard Carman takes 3rd, finish times 1 second apart. Smells like more winning to me.

Although we had come to do a road race on Saturday, being thrown headlong into my first crit was probably the best way it could have happened. Having made a pretty good showing the first day, we didn’t feel too inclined to come back for the same crit again at 930 AM. Instead we appeared at the Rouler party at Manhattanjack, still in our team kits, took advantage of the open bar and had a solid recovery meal of sausage salad and chocolate cookies with red wine.

Sparing a few minutes wandering around the parking lot, unable to find the registration-mobile, Robinson was really positive and in good spirits all day. Boedi was a champ for coming along to support, and shot some really great video and stills. Big ups to Stu for being such a great host and keeping us fueled and hydrated all day. It was a great weekend with you guys, thanks for everything. Our team wins.

Cheers,
Rich
Yeah You Ride